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Complete catalogue

   Philosophy and Religion
Books for the mind, heart, and soul.
Ifflepinn Island: A tale to read aloud for green-growing children and evergreen adults
By Muz Murray, Illustrated by the author
2014. ISBN 978-1-78201-052-4

Our hero Iffleplum is no ordinary ifflepinn. He dreams of dashing deeds and derring-do and saving damsels in distress. But on finding himself entrapped in a faery mushroom ring and menaced by the shambling shadow-creatures known as Gropes, he thinks again—too late! “Don’t throw your heart away on wild deeds,” his Ifflemother Mumkin had warned him. But alas! when his wild wishes suddenly come true, in fearful shock, the spirit of his heart flies out as he is whisked away on a terrifying and unexpected journey, left a wanderer with an empty heart. His search to find its elfin-spirit plunges him into the worlds of Half-Elves and Dwemmers, Men and Ghòrs, Trolls and Ogres, Umbelopes and Pogs, and more fantastical adventures than he ever dreamed…

Towards a Cornish Philosophy: Values, Thought, and Language for the West Britons in the Twenty-First Century
By Alan M. Kent, with a foreword by Mathew Staunton.
2013. ISBN 978-1-78201-045-6

Since the inception of Cornish Studies, the matter of Cornish Philosophy has suffered considerable neglect. Philosophy is a field in which humanity investigates problems connected with reality and existence; in so doing, investigating values, thought and language. Like other minority communities and peoples across the globe, the Cornish should be asking what makes them who they are. In this vital corrective, Towards a Cornish Philosophy, Alan M. Kent offers an initial study of the basic beliefs, attitudes and concepts belonging to the Cornish over time. Not only is the relationship of Cornish Philosophy to Celtic Studies examined, but so is its relationship to Romanticism, and the Enlightenment, culminating in observations on the philosophy of the Cornish language, Cornu-English, and the West Britons' obsession with memory, place and stone.

Behind the Looking-Glass: Reflections on the Myth of Lewis Carroll
By Sherry L. Ackerman, with a foreword by Karoline Leach.
2012. ISBN 978-1-78201-017-3

Behind the Looking-Glass offers a fresh perspective in the ongoing, contemporary deconstruction of the Carroll Myth. Through rigorous examination of numerous myths that have been hitherto unquestioned, Ackerman skilfully positions Lewis Carroll in the theological and philosophical contexts of his time. She uncovers a Carroll whose radical religio-philosophical counter-response to patriarchal materialism moved his intellectual journey, intentionally or otherwise, deep into the waters of mysticism. The image of Carroll as a dreary Victorian conservative gives way to that of a man with wide intellectual parameters, an inquiring mind and bold, far-sighted vision. Behind the Looking-Glass demon­strates how nineteenth century currents of spiritualism, theosophy and occult philosophy co-mingled with Carroll's interest in revived Platonism and Neoplatonism, showcasing the Alice and Sylvie and Bruno books as unique points of conjunction between Carroll's intellect and spirituality. The scholarship in this work, while rigorous, is softly mixed with the kind of academic frivolity that Carroll himself might have enjoyed. Ackerman exposes a Carroll who, having lost belief in the theological and mythological master plots of earlier eras, turned toward the imaginative fiction of wonderlands rife with philosophical content in response to his instinctive hunger for cosmic coherence and existential order.

An Beybel Sans: The Holy Bible in Cornish
Translated into Cornish by Nicholas Williams
2011. ISBN 978-1-904808-70-1

This is the first translation of the entire Bible to be published in Cornish. The translator of the Cornish Bible is Professor Nicholas Williams, the foremost present-day translator into the language. The first draft of his translation was based on the original languages together with a collation of several other versions. Next the translation was reviewed by a number of competent Cornish speakers, whose comments helped improve the readability of the work. Thereafter the translator searched the Middle and Late Cornish texts—miracle plays, homilies, and portions of scripture—to find all those passages where native Cornish renderings could be used in the translation. Such passages by speakers of traditional Cornish have been incorporated throughout the Cornish Bible, and add to its authenticity. Wherever possible, personal and geographical names are those attested in traditional Cornish. The volume contains ten maps, in which all the place-names appear in Cornish form. An Beybel Sans is written in Standard Cornish.

What thou wilt: Traditional and Innovative trends in Post-Gardnerian Witchcraft
By Jon Hanna
2010. ISBN 978-1-904808-43-5

The publication from 1954 of Gerald Gardner’s non-fiction works on witchcraft has led to the current public existence of two different trends of religious and magical belief and practice, both which identify themselves as Wicca. One form places a strong emphasis upon the transmission of traditional practices and a form of initiatory lineage similar to that practised by Gardner himself. The other covers a wider range of views on each of these aspects, but with the most common position being a strong distance between the traditional practices—giving a greater importance to innovation—and a complete or near-complete abandon ment of the concept of initiatory lineage. This book examines the differences and offers insights into both.

The Torah: Jewish and Samaritan versions compared
Arranged by Mark Shoulson
2008. ISBN 978-1-904808-18-3

The Samaritans share an origin with Jews, but the two peoples diverged thousands of years ago, already in Biblical times. The main schism between the cultures is the location of the Holy Temple, the “place the LORD your God will choose as a dwelling for his Name.” To the Jews, this meant Mount Moriah in Jerusalem. The Samaritans looked to God’s designation as a place of holiness and sacrifice in the book of Deuteronomy (11:29), and understood the designated site to be Mount Gerizim in Samaria, near the city of Shechem. There they continue to worship, and there even to this day they sacrifice the Passover offering every year.

The Samaritans consider only the Pentateuch to be a holy book; the rest of the Hebrew Scriptures are no more a part of the Samaritan Bible than the Christian New Testament is a part of the Jewish Bible. The Samaritan version of the Torah differs in several ways from the Jewish Masoretic version, and those differences are the purpose of this book. Both texts are given, in modern Square Hebrew script, on facing pages. Minor variations are printed in boldface type slightly larger than the ordinary text. Major variations are also printed in boldface type but even larger still than the minor variations.

George Fox: A Christian Mystic
By Hugh McGregor Ross
2008. ISBN 978-1-904808-17-6

A mystic is one who has had the experience that the divine Ultimate and the essence of the individual Self are fundamentally one and the same. In his maturity George Fox dictated a vivid account of his profound mystical experience, which transformed him from an unhappy questing youth into a charismatic spiritual giant. Unlike some other mystics he resolved to share his experience with others. This became his life’s work, and resulted in establishing the community known today as the Religious Society of Friends, or Quakers. He did this by travelling widely, addressing crowds, and by an amazing output of documents. Hugh McGregor Ross made an intensive study of these documents in the majestic Quaker Library in London. He there identified that Fox’s record of his spiritual awakening, which involved what in the seventeenth century was regarded as a blasphemy, had been tampered with. Here it is restored to its original form. It is followed by a great number of the documents Fox created to guide and support his followers, all given in his own words but edited sensitively for the modern reader. This is a unique record of the awakening of a mystic in the Christian tradition, and of living out that experience in his way of life.

Going it alone: Advice, comments, and sympathy for women over 50 who find themselves alone
By Jill Charlotte Stanford
2008. ISBN 978-1-904808-14-5

Jill Charlotte Stanford takes the devastating emotional subject of a woman finding herself alone over the age of 50—whether through death or from divorce—and offers her reader a bouquet of helpful advice, sympathy, and common sense laced with humor. Going It Alone is a gift to women over 50 who find themselves alone.

Thirty Essays on the Gospel of Thomas
By Hugh McGregor Ross
2008. ISBN 978-1-904808-12-1

These thirty Essays are independent of each other yet are all related to or derived from a study of the Gospel of Thomas. Thus they look at it from different points of view. They are the result of considering every possible aspect of the Gospel and its origin. The study focused on the Gospel itself, without being influenced by other ideas about the purpose and nature of Jesus’ mission.

The early Essays in the book relate to matter-of-fact features of the Gospel and how it came into existence and survived. Later Essays move on to expound crucial spiritual Teachings of Jesus. They make many references to the sayings in the Gospel and show how they link together into a woven whole. The set of Essays are of inestimable value in providing an understanding of the Gospel of Thomas.

Testament Noweth
Translated into Cornish by Nicholas Williams
2002. ISBN 978-0-9535975-4-3 (Spyrys a Gernow)

Bytegens hem yw an kensa prys a wrug oll an Testament Noweth omdhysquedhes yn Kernowek. An treylyer a usyas, mar vuer del ylly ef, pynag oll ran a’n Testament Noweth o kefys yn Kernowek tradycyonal. Defnyth re bue gwres kefrys a’n treylyansow screfys yn termyn an Dasserghyans, kynth o res yn cas ran anedhans amendya an text yn fras.

An lytherennans, gramasek ha kestrowen gwelys y’n present treylyans ma yw Kernowek Unys Amendys, versyon a Gernowek dasvewys yw yntendys dhe vos mar ogas avel possybyl dhe Gernowek an whetegves cansvledhen ha spesly dhe davas Jowan Treger, an screfer a’n text hyrra pros yw gesys yn Kernowek. Ny whelas an treylyer yn tyller vyth “purjya” an yeth ha defendya mes anedhy geryow Sawsnek, rag yma va ow cresy fatel godh dh’agan tavas dasvewys ny bos yn pub poynt kepar ha’n yeth a vedha cowsys kenyver jorna gans Kernowyon.